Eco-Tourism on the Outer Banks: What to Bring to Your Vacation Rental

Welcome back to our blog series on Eco-Tourism when visiting here on the Outer Banks. We hope you have enjoyed this fun series that we have at Joe Lamb Jr. & Associates have been sharing. In the past couple of months, we have learned how to keep our beaches clean along with some earth-friendly activities. Since this will be the final post on this series, we thought it was natural to let you know how you can bring eco-tourism to your OBX vacation rental and even your own home.  We understand how important it is to make sure that our beaches are free of trash for you to enjoy and the wildlife. But let’s take a peek at how you can help bring eco-tourism to your vacation rental and even back to your home after your vacation ends. 

Vacation Rental

Shower Head with Water Stream on Black Background

Did you know that eco-tourism is much more than keeping our beaches clean and finding earth-friendly activities? It also starts in your OBX vacation rental during your trip. You can help out by making sure that you can take advantage of the natural light within your rental. Many of our homes do have plenty of windows and doors to help bring in that natural sunlight. Just opening up the blinds or curtains within your rental can help save on the amount of electricity used. Another way that you can bring eco-tourism into your vacation rental is by conserving water. This can be done a few different ways, like watching how long the showers are, whether they’re indoors or outdoors, or leaving the hose turned on while you’re outdoors. And the last thing we wanted to share with you is making sure that you’re utilizing the outdoor trash cans and recycling bins.

Home Sweet Home

Recycling garbage such as glass, plastic, metal and paper

As you leave your vacation rental after you’ve had a wonderful vacation, why not bring some of the things you’ve learned during our eco-tourism tour home with you? Remember to reuse, reduce & recycle all products within your home. And finding fun, eco-friendly activities to do outdoors can go a long way. But it can also help you raise awareness around your community. Using energy-efficient light bulbs within your home can help save you some energy or by just turning off a light switch when you leave the room. Purchase things from a local store to support local businesses within your community. There are so many options that you can do to help bring eco-tourism back to your hometown.

There are many other options to help you bring eco-tourism into your vacation rental and your own home, and we wanted to share those with you. Remember we are still participating in the Plastic Bag Bench Project and we are still taking plastic bag donations at our main office. If you are still searching for that perfect OBX vacation rental for your next eco-friendly vacation, we have plenty to choose from. We hope that you enjoyed this blog series, and we hope to bring you more in the future.

Joe Lamb Jr. & Associates is one of the most trusted vacation rental managers in the local area by growing into a market leader in the Vacation Rental and Sales Industry. Joe Lamb Jr. and his family have played a vital and intricate role in the Outer Banks Community for decades. 

Over the past 50+ years, Joe Lamb Jr. & Associates have worked diligently to help promote the Outer Banks for the amazing beach and family vacation destination that it is, helping to increase tourism in the area and grow our beautiful community.

Fishing Honey Holes Along The OBX

– A Joe Lamb Jr. Blog Series

Welcome back to the third and final installment of our Outer Banks fishing blog series. Our first post of the series displayed the most popular types of fishing in the OBX while the second post focused on popular fish that you can catch here in the Outer Banks

Planning for memories to last a lifetime can be done at any of the following locations.

We are smack dab in the thick of the fishing season here in the Outer Banks. With the right insight and a little luck, you will be reeling in some monster fish in no time! So dream big and travel far!

Some of the Best Surf Fishing Spots in the OBX

A fisherman is silhouetted by a sunset on a beach in North Carolina as he gets a rod ready to cast out. Birds can be seen flying in the background

What are some of the most plentiful surf fishing areas?

On the Outer Banks, many people enjoy going surf fishing. It’s a fun activity, especially in the fall when the fishing is excellent and the ocean and air are both cooling off, making a day at the beach even more enjoyable. Where do you even begin when there are miles and miles of beach on which to cast your line? Here’s a rundown of some of the most well-known surf fishing spots along the Outer Banks.

Hatteras Inlet

Hatteras Inlet’s northern end requires a 4WD vehicle. Alternatively, you can park at the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum parking lot and walk 2 miles north to the beach. Take the ferry to get to the other side of the island. Summer ferries run every 30 minutes, from 5:00 a.m. to midnight, with each ferry holding 30-60 vehicles; off-season ferries run every hour. The trip takes about 40 minutes and follows the coastline of Hatteras Island before heading out into the open inlet waters. 

You can park near the ferry docks and walk to the beach, or you can drive to the 4WD beach access ramp down the road from the ferry docks. Before driving on the beach in the Cape Hatteras National Seashore, make sure you have a beach driving permit and a fishing license that are both still current.

Cape Point

Cape Point is a well-known surf fishing spot on the Outer Banks. North and South facing beaches are formed as a result of land jutting into the Atlantic Ocean and curving sharply back towards the shore at the Point. There are two powerful ocean currents that meet off Cape Point: The Labrador and the Gulf Streams. To get to the Point, you’ll need a four-wheel-drive vehicle and a beach driving permit, or you can walk from the public access point.

During peak times, Cape Point can be overrun with anglers vying for prime casting spots. Don’t trespass on anyone’s fishing territory, but don’t be shy about striking up a conversation either. Many of the local fishermen have been coming to Cape Point for decades and are happy to share a fish story or two, or even a few tips, with a newcomer.

Oregon Inlet

Oregon Inlet is the most visited inlet on the Outer Banks, and for good reason: it has an abundance of fishing spots. The sandy beach stretches from the oceanside to the sound side on the northern beach, and 4WD vehicles are authorized with a permit. It’s a great spot for surf fishing. In the inlet, the beach turns into a seawall and the soundside has a small sandy beach access. The southern beach is excellent for surf fishing. The southern side is better for fishermen who want to park their car and walk to the beach, while the northern side is better for anglers who want to drive out to the beach.

You don’t have to go to one of these places to have a productive surf fishing trip. Almost anywhere on our beaches is a good place to try your luck with the fishing rod. If you’re not a fan of surf fishing, try throwing a line in from one of the Outer Banks’ many piers instead. There are plenty of types of fishing for you to explore in the OBX! 

Some of the Best Sound Fishing Spots in the OBX

View of the Sound at sunset looking west

Where are the best fishing spots soundside?

When it comes to Outer Banks fishing, fall is prime time. However, fishing in the ocean isn’t for everyone, so we asked some local fishermen about great spots to fish in the sounds. Here are a few of the best-kept secrets in the Outer Banks. When fish find a spot with plenty of bait they stay there.

South Side of Oregon Inlet

It’s a great place to take kids and you can go fishing in the ocean-like waters. There’s parking and a short trail to a shallow lagoon or small bay right next to the Bonner Bridge on the south side. The bay is a great place for kids to learn how to fish because it is sheltered.

Whalehead Club Boat Basin

This is a safe place with a few surprises. Flounder have been caught in the basin, which is strange considering that the water is primarily fresh. Also, keep an eye out for largemouth bass. It’s a wonderful location for families with children.

Roanoke Island, South of Washington Baum Bridge Boat Ramp

NC Marine Fisheries built a dock at the end of the ramp, and locals swear by it. There are a lot of Rockfish and Spot in the water.

See You Soon in the OBX

The Outer Banks are unmatched by any other vacation destination, especially for Outdoor Junkies. Snag huge Bluefish, Stripers, and more from the beach. Paddle around the sound side of the islands to keep an eye out for big Red Drum, delicious Flounder, and other marine life. Add a rich fishing history and beautiful surroundings to the mix, you’ve found the ideal fishing spot.

Are you thinking of going fishing on the Outer Banks? Finding the new trails and roads less traveled is always exciting, so try a few of these spots and venture out to find some honey holes in the OBX on your own!

Joe Lamb Jr. & Associates is one of the most trusted vacation rental managers in the local area by growing into a market leader in the Vacation Rental and Sales Industry. Joe Lamb Jr. and his family have played a vital and intricate role in the Outer Banks Community for decades. 

Over the past 50+ years, Joe Lamb Jr. & Associates have worked diligently to help promote the Outer Banks for the amazing beach and family vacation destination that it is, helping to increase tourism in the area and grow our beautiful community.

Eco-Tourism on the Outer Banks: Featuring Earth Friendly Activities

Welcome back to our blog series on Eco-Tourism here on the Outer Banks. In the last post, we learned about how you can help keep our beaches clean for others to enjoy trash-free. If you missed that article check it out here. We wanted to dig a little deeper into learning a little more about some eco-friendly activities that you can take advantage of too. Staying in one of our Outer Banks vacation rentals will allow you and your family to be able to enjoy some of these activities for free. Let’s look at a few of the great places where you can sit back and explore the Outer Banks while taking in a few eco-friendly activities. 

Yoga on the Beach

A young woman wearing gym clothes doing yoga on the beach on a sunny day.

A great way to enjoy the clean beaches on the Outer Banks is to do yoga on the beach. If you are staying in an oceanfront vacation rental, then all you’ll have to do is head out the door, walk onto the sand, and set up for some relaxing yoga and listen to the surf roll in. You can also enjoy your yoga session out on the deck or alongside the pool of your vacation home.  Whether you decide to do it first thing in the morning as the sun is rising or in the evening as the sun is setting, anytime is a perfect time. If you don’t have a yoga mat with you on your vacation, then have no fear, as a beach towel will work in its place.

Visit a Nature Reserve

White heron standing in the grass, water, at a reserve

Another great way to explore and enjoy some eco-friendly activities on the Outer Banks is by visiting one of the many nature reserves we have. Keeping our beaches clean is a must that helps with our eco-tourism and keeping our nature reserves and parks clean. Here are a few of the nature reserves that you can visit here on the Outer Banks:

  • Kitty Hawk Woods Coastal Reserve – located in Kitty Hawk
  • Nags Head Woods Preserve – located in Kill Devil Hills
  • Run Hill State National Area Dedicated Nature Preserve – located in Kill Devil Hills
  • Alligator River Refuge – located in Manteo
  • Currituck Banks Reserve – located in Corolla
  • Coastal NC Refuges Gateway Visitor Center – located in Manteo
  • Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge – located in Rodanthe

While many other parks, nature reserves, and other fun activities are all eco-friendly here on the Outer Banks, we wanted to mention these. If you are still looking to find a great place to vacation while on the OBX, check out our many available rentals from oceanfront to soundside, we have you covered.  We hope that you love this blog series as much as we are.

Joe Lamb Jr. & Associates is one of the most trusted vacation rental managers in the local area by growing into a market leader in the Vacation Rental and Sales Industry. Joe Lamb Jr. and his family have played a vital and intricate role in the Outer Banks Community for decades. 

Over the past 50+ years, Joe Lamb Jr. & Associates have worked diligently to help promote the Outer Banks for the amazing beach and family vacation destination that it is, helping to increase tourism in the area and grow our beautiful community.

Eco-Tourism on the Outer Banks: How to Help Keep the Outer Banks Clean

sand, wooden stairs, railings, atlantic ocean, waves, blue skies, sand dunes, boat in distance, soft clouds in sky

A Joe Lamb Jr. Blog Series –

Eco-Tourism is in full swing on the Outer Banks and every visitor plays a part in keeping our beaches & waterways pristine for all. We here at Joe Lamb Jr wanted to share a new blog series with some simple tips, ideas, & educational offerings that you and your family can implement & enjoy on your next visit. Staying in one of our oceanfront vacation rentals will allow you and your family to enjoy some of the best uninterrupted coastal views that the Atlantic Ocean can offer. If clean wide open beaches are for you then let’s get started! 

Keeping our Beaches Clean

You’ll notice one of the beautiful things about the Outer Banks is how clean the ocean is, the sound, and our beaches. We take pride in not only keeping the wildlife safe but also our guests as well. We have come up with a few ways that you and your family can help fight to keep the OBX clean for all.

reusable coral bag, white water bottle, white brick wall in background, silver and black tumbler, white countertop
  • Switch to Reusable Straws – You’ll notice that many local restaurants have done away with plastic straws & switched over to recyclable paper straws here on the Outer Banks. If you don’t care for the paper straws, be sure to pack some reusable straws that you can wash and reuse for your whole trip.
  • Bring Reusable Cups – Another big thing that we have done is discontinue using disposable cups so be sure to pack your favorite reusable tumblers with you. Not only can many of the metal tumblers keep your drinks warm, but they can also help keep your drinks cool too in the hot summer sun.
  • Use Recyclable or Reusable Bags – Bringing with you either a recyclable or reusable bag for your shopping needs is excellent. Many of the grocery stores here on the OBX will give you a discount if you shop using your bags. Let’s help keep our environment and sea life safe by not using plastic bags.
  • Carry In / Carry Out Rules – You’ll notice that when you step onto the sand from your oceanfront vacation rental that there should be no trash. Unlike other beaches around the world, the OBX takes pride in our clean beaches. After your day on the beach, be sure to clean up your things and throw the trash away. It only takes a few minutes to pick up a little trash and leave the beach the way you .

 Reduce, Reuse & Recycle

As many of our children go to school, they may have learned this helpful reminder phrase – Reduce, Reuse, Recycle. As mentioned above, reducing the number of plastics you use while on vacation and reusing those items is a great first step to keeping the Outer Banks clean. 

Let’s talk about recycling for a bit. We at Joe Lamb Jr are a part of the Women’s Club here on the OBX as Mrs. Lamb is a founding member. Through this community connection we have partnered with NexTrex to help with plastic bag recycling.  

Our goal is to collect 480+lbs (about 40,500) of plastic bags to have those bags recycled into a high-performance composite community bench!  If you would like to help us reach this goal and be part of the plastic bag recycling effort along our coastline bags be dropped off at three different locations in our area.

map showing three drop off locations for recycling, Dare County Baum Center, Outer Banks Family YMCA & Joe Lamb Jr & Associates on map of the Outer Banks, NC
  • Joe Lamb Jr. & Associates 
  • YMCA
  • Baum Center – Day Programs for Adults

While there are many other ways that you and your family can help protect our beaches, ocean waters, sea life, and wildlife safe from trash, we wanted to share these with you. If you don’t have your next vacation planned to stay with us later this year, look at our OBX vacation rentals today. We hope that you will follow along with us over the next few months on more of the Eco-Tourism on the Outer Banks and how you can help too!

Joe Lamb Jr. & Associates is one of the most trusted vacation rental managers in the local area by growing into a market leader in the Vacation Rental and Sales Industry. Joe Lamb Jr. and his family have played a vital and intricate role in the Outer Banks Community for decades. 

Over the past 50+ years, Joe Lamb Jr. & Associates have worked diligently to help promote the Outer Banks for the amazing beach and family vacation destination that it is, helping to increase tourism in the area and grow our beautiful community.

The Beach-Is There One that is the Best on the Outer Banks?

Kitty Hawk Beach in the summertime.
Kitty Hawk Beach in the summertime.

People are always asking us, “What is your favorite Outer Banks beach?” 

It’s a tough question to answer, because the truth is, we don’t have one.

When it comes to the beach, or at least an Outer Banks beaches, all of them have a some characteristics in common. From Carova to Ocracoke all of our beaches have a nice soft sand and especially now that so many have been nourished, they tend to be fairly wide. Although there are some exceptions, for the most part, Outer Banks beaches are pretty easy to get to.

All North Carolina ocean beaches are in the public domain, meaning anyone can use the beach when they are on it. Access to the beach, however, is not a public right, and crossing private property to get to the beach is trespassing. Please use public access to get on the beach.

Rather than call out specific beaches, we thought it would be better to give a more general description of each area and what the beaches in each area have to offer.

Corolla

From the southern border of Currituck County at the Sanderling in Duck or where the NC 12 pavement ends north of the Village of Corolla, there’s about 12 miles of wonderful, soft sand.

Currituck County provides four parking areas for beach access. By far the largest is the southern access off Yaupon Road, a little bit south of the Harris Teeter shopping center.

The bathhouse at this access is wonderful. Large and well-maintained, there are a good number of outdoor showers and a fairly large parking area.

One thing to be aware of though, it is a fairly long trek to the beach; about a quarter of a mile, although there is a boardwalk that makes things easier. However, this is one of the best beaches anywhere with a lot of room between the sea and the dunes. 

Farther north in the more built up areas of Corolla, parking for beach access is either immediately adjacent to the dunes or across the street.

Something for parents with younger children to consider, the Albacore Beach Access is very close to the Food Lion in Monterey Plaza, and is the closest to retail stores and businesses.

The beach tends to be a bit wider farther south than on the north end toward Carova.

Carova is the 4WD area of the Currituck Banks, north of Corolla. It’s’ a very nice beach but be aware, the beach is the road in this area. If you do decide to drive to Carova to enjoy the beach, Currituck County does require a permit to park on the beach.

Kitty Hawk, Kill Devil Hills and Nags Head

These three towns, Kitty Hawk, Kill Devil Hills and Nags Head are actually the core of the traditional Outer Banks vacation spots. They are the most built up and because of that, they will have more businesses, stores and services within easy walking distance than other areas.

Kitty Hawk has the name recognition. Kill Devil Hills is actually the largest town on the Outer Banks. And Nags Head is where it all began–the first tourists started coming to Nags Head in the 1820s.

There are too many parking areas and beach access points to note them all. Look for the CAMA Beach Access sign. Generally that denotes a parking lot for the beach, although sometimes it’s simply an access point with parking elsewhere.

Beach access sign.
Beach access sign.

All of the beaches in this area have been nourished and they are in very good condition, and we don’t have a clear favorite at all. 

The widest beach is probably south of Jennette’s Pier in Nags Head. It is a great location for families. The bathhouse is large and well-maintained and there are a couple of places very close by for food and beach necessities. That area is also a popular surfing site.

Coquina Beach, Cape Hatteras National Seashore, South Nags Head

We had to include Coquina Beach. The entrance is directly across from the entrance to Bodie Island Lighthouse about a mile and a half south of the intersection of Old Oregon Inlet Road and NC 12, which is considered South Nags Head.

This is very much the original look to the Outer Banks. Not a home in sight; rolling sand dunes covered in sea grass; and a beautiful beach.

The parking lot is huge and there is a wind powered bathhouse with showers.

We highly recommend this beach—it is absolutely beautiful. But, be sure to take everything you’re going to need. The nearest businesses, stores or restaurants are at least four or five miles away.

About Duck and Southern Shores

We haven’t included the towns of Duck or Southern Shores for a reason. Their beaches are wonderful, but access to their beaches is permit only for property owners. People renting in a home in those towns do have permission to use the beach.

A recent lawsuit in the town of Duck may allow public access, although that ruling may be appealed.

Are you ready for summer? Here at Joe Lamb Jr. & Associates we’re gearing up and can’t wait to hear from you.

Are Harbor Seals Bypassing the Outer Banks This Year?

A harbor seal rests on the beach by Jennette's Pier. Photo Darryl Law.
A harbor seal rests on the beach by Jennette’s Pier. Photo Darryl Law.

The weather finally turned cold today. Honestly with that northeast wind blowing at around 25, bitterly cold is properly how it could be described.

It’s been a while since it has been this cold on the Outer Banks. It certainly has saved on heating bills, but the truth is, it is January and it is supposed to be colder than it has been.

Interesting that something we normally see on local beaches seems remarkable by their absence this year. Typically, just about now, harbor seals will pop up out of the surf to rest on the sand for a bit.

They’re usually younger seal, not quite at full strength yet and not as adept at finding food as the full-grown seals.

From a distance, they certainly do look cute. Ok, they even look cute close up. But it is extremely important to leave them alone.

Perhaps most importantly, they are wild animals and they would probably view an approaching human as a threat. An adult Atlantic harbor seal weighs 180 to 200 pounds a perhaps a bit more. And they bite. That is one of their primary defensive weapons.

Because they live in the wild, they are prone to carrying disease and parasites—another good reason to not come in contact with them.

And then there is this—they are a protected species under federal law. Feeding them or in any way harassing them is a federal offense.

There is an OBX Stranding Response Team can be reached at 252-455-9654 to report a seal on the beach.

The beaches of the Outer Banks are a place of continual wonder. Wander along the sea for a week or two while staying at a Joe Lamb, Jr. & Associates home.

A Springlike December Day on the Outer Banks

Waiting for a wave as pelicans soar overhead.
Waiting for a wave as pelicans soar overhead.

We seem to be in an almost springlike weather pattern right now on the Outer Banks. Hard to imagine that Christmas just happened and the New Year is almost here.

The high today topped out around 60. The winds were so light they were barely noticed and the sea had a beautiful sheen to it. The waves were breaking in smooth predictable patterns.

Surfers were running a critical eye over conditions. The waves weren’t really all that big, but but for someone with a longboard or paddle board, there was something to ride.

There was a small pod of dolphin just beyond the break this morning at Kitty Hawk. It was a little bit surprising to see them in December. Although the local dolphin population doesn’t migrate for thousands of miles as many other ocean mammals do, they do head for warmer waters as winter sets in

There was a SUP on the water this morning. He was doing pretty well with the waves. Using his paddle as a rudder, he was able to get a couple of good long rides from some waves that surfers might have passed on.

There were a few families and a couple of dogs enjoying the beach, but for the most part there wasn’t much to disturb anyone seeking some time to relax and enjoy nature.

The weather will change. It always does, although for the next few days the Outer Banks forecast calls for very mild December days.

It all makes for a great time to visit us here at Joe Lamb, Jr. & Associates. Give us a call or check us out online and let us show you has we can make your next vacation truly memorable.

Black Bear Central at Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge

A black bear resting at Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge.
A black bear resting at Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge.

Every once in a while we’ll get a notice or something will come across our desk that is a reminder of just how remarkable the world of the Outer Banks is.

In this case, it’s not quite the Outer Banks, but awfully close. Right next door at Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge.

The Refuge, it seems, has one of the largest, if not the largest, concentrations of black bear on the East Coast. Perhaps one of the largest populations to be found anywhere.

For those of us who have driven on US 64 as it passes through East Lake, which borders ARNWR, it’s probably not much of a surprise hearing this. It’s not as though a bear is seen every day, but it is not that rare either. Same for US 264 through Stumpy Point.

For that matter, anyone who has hiked, kayaked, biked or spent any time in the Reserve, seeing a black bear is a part of the experience.

By and large the bears want nothing whatsoever to do with humans, so when they do see one of us, they saunter off into the brush or woods. To our civilized eyes they look kind of cute, and certainly harmless, but the fact is they are wild animals weighing between 200-400 pounds with a lot of muscle. 

About the only time they will get upset or approach humans is if there is interaction with cubs. Mama bears tend to think of that as a threat.

Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge is 152,000 acre refuge that is for the most part on mainland Dare County. There are hiking and biking trails in the refuge as well as extensive areas for kayaking. 

It’s name is a reference to the northern most reach of the alligator, so yes, there are alligators that live there, as well as an extraordinary diversity of birds and an active breeding program for the endangered red wolf.

The Outer Banks is a place of many surprises. A visit to this remarkable strip of sand is better with a stay at a Joe Lamb, Jr. & Associates home.

Living Shoreline Takes Shape along Moor Shore Road

Planting marsh grass at the Moor Shore Road living shoreline.

Living shorelines are becoming the new wave of shoreline protection. On the Outer Banks we’re seeing more and more of them being put into place.

They are not as quick, easy or cheap to install as a bulkhead, but they have some significant advantages over hardened structures. Mostly, they don’t wear out.

More than they don’t wear out, they actually restore and renew the nearshore environment of sounds and estuaries.

They are also very effective. Over time, much more effective than a bulkhead.

One of the largest living shoreline projects on the Outer Banks is on Moor Shore Road in Kitty Hawk. The project began late last year in November when sills were put into place about 60’ from the shore.

Funded with grants obtained by the North Carolina Coastal Federation, the project is now wrapping up with a few hundred volunteers planing marsh grass. 

It’s somewhat tedious work. Small plugs of grass—in this case juncus—are put into the ground, either just under water in the shallows or along the beach where it’s wet.

The plugs look a lot like plant starts, which is what they are. If there are no extremely high winds over the next few weeks, the grass will be well on its way to being a permanent part of the environment.

The sills, which look solid from the shoreline, actually have slits in them to allow wave energy to be dissipated. What the marsh grass will do is further dissipate that wave energy so that waves do not overwash the shoreline and Moor Shore Road.

The marsh grass is also a favored habitat of a number of breeding fish and will help to maintain healthy levels of seafood.

There is always something interesting happening on the Outer Banks. Stay a week or two with Joe Lamb, Jr. & Associates and discover the world of life on a sandbar.

An Outer Banks Sanctuary Takes the Lead

High waters of the Currituck Sound at the Audubon Sanctuary docks in Corolla.
High waters of the Currituck Sound at the Audubon Sanctuary docks in Corolla.

The Pine Island Hunt Club is now the Donal C. O’Brien Audubon Center in Corolla. At one time it was one of the premier hunting lodges on the Currituck Sound, it’s holdings stretching from the Currituck Sound to the Atlantic Ocean.

Before NC 12 connected the Currituck Banks with the rest of the world, to drive to Corolla, everyone had to pass through the guard gate at the south end of the property. The guard house is still there on the south end right on the Dare/Currituck County line.

There’s a wide, hard-paced path that used to be the dirt road everyone took to get drive north. It’s a wonderful walk now, and perfect for any bike that has fat tires.

Forty years ago it was donated to the Audubon Society by the Slick family, the last owners of the property. For the past 10 years, Audubon has been solely responsible for maintaining the grounds.

The administrative center is in a beautiful old building—the 1913 clubhouse. 

There was a gathering at that clubhouse recently of northeastern North Carolina elected officials, representatives of the Governor and Audubon North Carolina executives.

It was an interesting meeting, bringing together a variety of ways of viewing how and what government should do. But what was particularly interesting was the agreement—not consensus, but agreement—that concerted action was necessary to mitigate rising waters.

It had rained very hard the day before the meeting. The ground was saturated and at the docks where kayak tours are launched, Currituck Sound had flooded the road leading to it. 

Robbie Fearn, Sanctuary Manager explained what was happening.

“One of the big challenges that has really not been addressed about barrier islands is that you have the ocean coming up on one side and the sound on the other side. The water table sits on this pocket of salt water underneath. As that come up, every time it rains, like it did buckets last night, that water has no place to go,” he said.

To mitigate some of those effects, Audubon will be being a very large living shoreline project on the property soon. Other plans were also discussed that will keep the facilities viable for some time.

The Outer Banks is a beautiful place to live or visit. Come stay with us at Joe Lamb, Jr. & Associates and discover for yourself what life on a sandbar is all about.