Shakespeare on the Outer Banks Stage

King of the Faeries, Oberon, lectures his Queen, Titania. She is not impressed.

Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” offers a different theater experience for Outer Banks audiences. Brought to the stage by the Theater of Dare, it is a theatrical classic done right.

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream” is silly, absurd, fun and very funny. It is also one of Shakespeare’s most accessible plays. The language is the classic Elizabethan verse of the Bard’s day, but the the way the words come together and the words themselves, make this one of the most easily understood of all of Shakespeare’s plays.

After 28 years, his is the first time the Theater of Dare has ventured into Shakespeare. Too bad, too, because the play was surprisingly well done. Or perhaps we shouldn’t be too surprised given the consistent quality of TOD productions.

A Brief Description of the Plot

The play has so many twists and turns and absurd plot devices that it does not lend itself to an easy description. For those, however, who have never seen the play or know about, here is the thumbnail description.

Hermia is in love with Lysander but Hermia’s father, Egeus has ordered her to marry Demetrius, who professes his love for Hermia. The Duke of Athens, Theseus, orders Hermia to obey her father’s wishes or face expulsion or death. 

Lysander and Hermia decide to elope. Their play is to meet in the forest. They reveal their plans to Helena, who they think is a true friend, but Helena is in love with Demetrius who wants nothing to do with her. Nonetheless, she tells Demetrius of the plot of the plot, hoping he will see that Hermia truly loves Lysander and in his disappointment will turn to her.

Meanwhile Oberon, King of the Faeries, is beset with marital problems with his queen, Titania. It’s a bit unclear who is at fault, but Titania makes it clear she will neither speak to nor acknowledge Oberon.

Oberon sends his chief minion, Puck, on a quest to find a flower whose nectar, when drizzled in the eyes of the sleeping will cause them to fall in love with the first being of any sort they see upon awakening.

And after that the plot twists become too numerous to list.

This was the first weekend for “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” The production winds up next weekend with Friday and Saturday evening shows and a Sunday Matinee. The play is performed at Roanoke Island Festival Park.

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”  is just one example of the many great things happening on the Outer Banks. Come stay with Joe Lamb, Jr. & Associates and discover the real Outer Banks.

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